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Product Life Cycle And Environmental Impact Assessment Of 7up Bottle

TITLE PAGE                                                         

Certification

Dedication

Acknowledgment

Table of Content

List of Tables

ABSTRACT

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1    Background of the study

1.2    Statement of the problem

1.3    Objective of the study

1.4    Research question

1.5    Significance of the study

1.6    Scope of the study

1.7 Limitation of the study

1.8 Definition of terms

CHAPTER TWO: REVIEW OF LITERATURE

2.1    Conceptual framework’

2.2    Theoretical Framework

CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1    Introduction

3.2    Research Design

3.3    Population of the study

3.4    Sample size determination

3.5    Sample size selection technique and procedure

3.6    Research Instrument and Administration

3.7    Method of data collection

3.8    Method of data analysis

3.9    Validity of the Study

3.10  Reliability of the study

3.11  Ethical Consideration

CHAPTER FOUR: DATA PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS

4.1    Data Presentation

4.2    Research Hypothesis

CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

5.1    Summary

5.2    Conclusion

5.3    Recommendation

References

Appendix

 

 

Abstract

This study was on product life cycle and environmental impact assessment of 7up bottle. Three objectives were raised which included; Study the stages in the life cycle of the 7up container glass, with consideration to a particular batch, assess the impacts associated with every stage in the life of a the bottle and study the span of the bottles with 7up bottling Company, its end users and back to the Sunglass Company. A total of 77 responses were received and validated from the enrolled participants where all respondents were drawn from staff of Nigeria bottling company, Aba. Hypothesis was tested using Chi-Square statistical tool (SPSS).

 

 Chapter one

Introduction

1.1Background of the study

Glass Life-Cycle Assessment The product Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) allows to quantify a product‘s environmental footprint, in accordance with international standards, It studies two major aspects:

  1. The whole product Life Cycle: from the raw materials and production phase to the end of the product life.
  2. All environmental impacts: water consumption, air pollution, resource utilization, and energy.

While a project life cycle assessment establishes an important quantitative benchmark, the full sustainable benefits of glass packaging include additional environmental, health, social and economic dimensions that reach above and beyond what can be measured in an LCA. These include health and safety, recycling, reuse and resource efficiency; the full benefits of glass social, environmental and technical recycling and reuse. Glass recycling and reuse contribute significantly to reducing glass packaging‘s carbon footprint (Abrahams, and John 2002). The use of recycled glass or cullet in batch materials has the following beneficial impacts:

  1. Every 1 kg of cullet used replaces 1.2kg of virgin raw materials that would otherwise need to be extracted.
  2. Every 10 percent of recycled glass or cullet used in the production results in an approximate 5 percent reduction in carbon emission and energy savings of about 3 percent.
  3. Glass is resource efficient; it can be reused in its original form more than other packaging materials. Additionally, several initiatives currently underway in the glass industry that will further increase the efficiency of glass packaging. Such efforts include including ; to improve recovery and recycling of glass containers, help eliminate the diversion of glass to landfill; leading to a decrease in energy use and global warming potential (Andreola, et.al., 2005).
  4. Light weighting glass containers reduces raw material usage, emissions, energy use and the overall weight.
  5. Packaging‘s most important function is product preservation and no other
    packaging material does this better than glass.

1.2 Life History of Glass According to Chang, (2008), glass dates back to the Stone Age when naturally occurring glass (especially the volcanic glass obsidian) was used globally by many Stone Age societies for the production of sharp cutting tools and jewelry. Another rare form of naturally occurring glass is called fulgurite (commonly called ‗petrified lightning‘) which occurs when lightning strikes sand and the resultant heat sometimes fuses the sand into long slender glass tubes. The scarcity and selective source areas of these naturally occurring glasses made them valuable materials for trade. Archaeological evidence however suggests that the first true glass was made in coastal North Syria, Mesopotamia or Ancient Egypt, (Douglas, 1972).
Early glass production relied on grinding techniques borrowed from stone working. This meant that glass was ground and carved at a cold state. The disasters that overtook the Late Bronze Age civilizations brought glass-making to a halt and it only picked up again in its former sites, in Syria and Cyprus, in the 9th century BCE, when the techniques for making colorless glass were discovered. In Egypt however, glass-making did not revive until it was reintroduced in Ptolemaic Alexandria, (Helmenstine, 2012).

1.3 Statement of the Research Problem

When you buy a bottle of 7up drink, most of the cost is for the liquid and the bottle. But what about the environmental cost? Manufacturing, filling, labeling, shipping, storing and recycling of the bottles is expensive. In responding to the imperative to reduce greenhouse gases, life cycle modeling tool is used to measures the environmental impact of every stage in the bottle life cycle. Each of these life cycle stages yields carbon emissions that contribute to the total carbon footprint. As a result, customers and consumers get a clear picture of 7up bottle packaging which provides insight into the bottle quality and the bottle‘s positive or negative environmental impacts.

1.4 Aim of the Study

The aim of this research is to assess the life cycle of 7up bottle production and the associated environmental impacts generated at every stage, using Sunglass as a case study.

1.5 Objective of the Study

The objectives of this study are to:

  1. Study the stages in the life cycle of the 7up container glass, with consideration to a particular batch
  2. Assess the impacts associated with every stage in the life of a the bottle
  • Study the span of the bottles with 7up bottling Company, its end users and back to the Sunglass Company

Research hypotheses

The research is guided by the following hypotheses

HO1: there is no impacts associated with every stage in the life of the bottle

H1: there is impacts associated with every stage in the life of the bottle.

HO2: there are no stages in the life cycle of the 7up container glass, with consideration to a particular batch

H1: there are stages in the life cycle of the 7up container glass, with consideration to a particular batch.

 

1.7 Significance of The Study.

To evaluate the environmental profile of 7 up bottle, through its life cycle stages and determining its improvement opportunities., towards having more sustainable and more environment friendly 7up bottle.The outcome of the study will help us to understand the requirement and potentiality of 7up bottle packaging industry.

1.8 Basic Assumption The basic assumptions of this study are:
i. There are adverse environmental impacts in the life cycle of 7up container glasses that need to be addressed.

  1. There will be possible solutions to minimize the adverse environmental impacts by 75%.

1.9 Delimitation of the Study

The delimitation of this study is to work with data collected from Sunglass Nigeria Ltd, Kaduna on a particular batch of feed consisting 50% of Virgin materials for glass and 50% Cullet.

1.10 Scope of the Study

The study covers raw materials extraction and processing, heating and melting stage of the raw materials, bottle formation, distribution, usage and end of life.

Definition of terms

Product life cycle: A product life cycle is the amount of time a product goes from being introduced into the market until it’s taken off the shelves. There are four stages in a product’s life cycle—introduction, growth, maturity, and decline. Newer, more successful products push older ones out of the market.

Environmental impact: An environmental impact is defined as any change to the environment, whether adverse or beneficial, resulting from a facility’s activities, products, or services. In other words it is the effect that people’s actions have on the environment

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