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Download this complete Project material titled; A Dialogue Between Lines And Floral Motifs In Painting with abstract, chapters 1-5, references, and questionnaire. Preview Abstract or chapter one below

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ABSTRACT

A Dialogue between Lines and Floral Motifs in Painting
This research was focussed on creating a dialogue between lines and the floral in
painting. Many painters have worked on floral paintings looking at the flower
exclusively. There were also research works done on the floral form but, non to the
knowledge of the researcher were in relation to lines as centre of interest. The study
aimed at exploring the interactive role of lines as they affected the forms and shapes of
the flower. While the objectives were firstly to illustrate harmonious coexistence of line
on the shape and form of flower, secondly to create compositions in which the floral form
is fully fused with lines, finally to explore the possibilities of reducing these fused forms
into simple lines and geometric forms. The methodology for this research was practice
based, and data for the study was gathered through the processes of observation,
photographs and sketches. Instruments employed for data collection were camera, scanner
and the computer. Manipulation of data in the studio led to works being categorized into
two main headings, Exploratory and Developmental categories. The Exploratory category
was further sub divided into two stages, namely Representational and Experimental
stages. The Representational stage, focussed on realistic rendition of the floral forms with
subdued lines. While the Experimental stage was directed towards producing works in
which lines became dominant while the flowers were transformed into abstract forms,
diverse types of media were explored. The Development category was also divided into
three stages namely; “Geometric and Organic lines Infusion”, “Organic lines Infusion”
and “Geometric lines Infusion”. Geometric and Organic lines Infusion, saw a mixture of
mechanical and curvy lines used in making Plate XIV, which was simplified to produce
three more works in stages. Organic lines Infusion saw only irregular wavy lines used in
creating Plate XVIII, which was progressively simplified into producing other paintings.
Geometric lines infusion, an abstract floral fashioned using horizontal, vertical and
diagonal lines was created, which was also simplified to produce three more paintings.
The following findings were discovered; that the use of lines fall into two major
categories, line can be used as a means to an end; this is when line is used in its traditional
role of bordering objects or as mere brush strokes. Line can also be used as an end in
itself; this is when line is used for its expressive qualities as seen in Mondrian’s and
Kandinsky’s works. Organic lines are more harmonious with the floral forms in realistic
rendition compared to Geometric lines. It was also observed that lines were more
expressively used in abstract rendition in comparison to realistic rendition. The researcher
recommends that further studies should be carried out to establish if floral can be made to
interact further with lines, space and texture.

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Title page……………………………………………………………………………….i
Declaration……………………………………………………………………………..ii
Certification…………………………………………………………………………….iii
Dedication………………………………………………………………………………iv
Acknowledgement………………………………………………………………………v
Abstract…………………………………………………………………………………vi
Table of content………………………………………………………………………..vii
List of Figures………………………………………………………………………….viii
List of Plates……………………………………………………………………………ix
CHAPTER ONE
1.0 INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………..…………….1
1.1 Introduction……………………………………………………………………….1
1.2 Background of the Study………………………..………………………….……..1
1.3 Statement of the Problem………………………………………………………….3
1.4 Aim and Objectives of the Study………………………………………………….3
1.5 Significance of the Study………………………………………………………….3
1.6 Justification of the Study………………………………………………………….4
1.7 Scope of the Study………………………………………………………………..4
1.8 Conceptual Frame Work………………………………………………………….4
CHAPTER TWO
2.0 REVIEW OF LITERATURE…..………………………………………………..6
2.1 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………6
2.2 Review of Literature on Lines and Flowers………………………………………..6
2.3 Works Rendered in Lines…………………………………………………………17
2.4 Floral Paintings……………………………………………………………………26
2.5 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………31
CHAPTER THREE
2.0 METHODOLOGY.……………………………………………………………..32
3.1 Introduction……………………………………………………………………….32
viii
3.2 Data Collection…………………………………………………………………….32
3.2.1 Observations…………………………………………………………………….32
3.2.2 Photographs……………………………………………………………………..32
3.2.3 Internet…………………………………………………………………………..33
3.3 Data Gathering Instruments………………………………………………………..33
3.3.1 Camera…………………………………………………………………………..34
3.3.2 Scanner………………………………………………………………………….34
3.3.3 Computer………………………………………………………………………..34
3.4 Analysis of Data…………………………………………………………………..34
3.4.1. Exploratory Category.…………………………………………………………..35
3.4.1.1 Representational stage…………………………………………………………35
3.4.1.2 Experimental stage…………………………………………………………….35
3.4.2. Developmental Category…..……………………………………………………36
3.4.2.1. Geometric and Organic lines infusion………………………………………..36
3.4.2.2 Organic lines infusion…………………………………………………………36
3.4.2.3 Geometric lines infusion………………………………………………………37
3.5 Sketches……………………………………………………………………………37
3.6 Choice of Medium…………………………………………………………………41
CHAPTER FOUR
4.0 ANALYSIS OF STUDIO WORKS………………………………………………42
4.1 Introduction………………………………………………………………………..42
4.2 Representational stage……………………………………………………………..42
4.3 Experimental stage…………………………………………………………………45
4.4 Geometric and Organic lines infusion……………………………………………..54
4.5 Organic lines infusion………………………………………………………………58
4.6 Geometric lines infusion……………………………………………………………62
4.7 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………….66
CHAPTER FIVE
5.0 SUMMARY, FINDINGS, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS…..67
5.1 Introduction………………………………………………………………………….67
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5.2 Summary……………………………………………………………………………67
5.3 Findings…………………………………………………………………………….68
5.4 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………….69
5.5 Recommendations…………………………………………………………………..69
REFERENCE………………………………………………………………………….71

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION
1.1 Introduction
The term dialogue has been metaphorically employed by painters to explore subjects.
An example is Gani Odutokun’s “Dialogue with Mona Lisa” Fig.19 the painting
represents an African Sculpture and Mona Lisa in a creative exercise. Dialogue itself is a
form of conversation between two or more people as the Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary
and thesaurus states. Lines on the other hand are tools or elements with which the artist
employs to realise his form. There are different types and sizes of lines, which creates the
possibility of realising any art form. The dialogue between lines and floral, is a painterly
exploration that will expose the possibility of an interaction of the two elements lines and
floral, in which both elements have a certain share of prominence as they affect each
other.
The flower is the reproductive portion of any plant in botanical term, and the word
“flower” especially applies when part or all of the reproductive structure is distinctive in
colour and form according to Encyclopaedia Britannica. There are about 230,000 to
270,000 species of flowering plant according to David (2012), presented in different
colours, shapes and sizes. The dialogue will expose to the viewer the many aspects of
lines using the flower as a medium.
1.2 Background of the Study
Flowers have served as a source of interest and inspiration for many artists over
generations, this fascination has rendered them as subjects for detailed studies. Gardens
are known to be places of recluse and serenity, offering an ideal environment for
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creativity to flourish, as seen in botanical illustration by Redoute (1756) called “les
Rose”, who was known for his watercolours of roses, lilies and other flowers according to
Robert (2012). Monet (1840-1926) made comprehensive studies of the flower, as he
would paint the same subject at different times of the day capturing the effects of light on
it, examples of such works are the Fig.12“Water lilies evening effect” and “ Water lilies
13”. Van Gogh (1853-1890) also captured the floral form in many of his works with
emphasis on the “Sunflower” Fig. 20 and “Vase with Fifteen Sunflower”. Federico (2001)
noted that “Odilon Redon (1840- 1916) explores more into symbolism and spirituality as
he derives inspiration from the floral forms which are visible in his works, often mixing
them with human forms in some compositions”, an example of such works is “Ophelia”.
Fred (2011) states that “O’Keeffe captured the growing plant’s slow, controlled motion
while converting the plant into a powerful abstract composition of lines, forms, and
colours”, an example of such work is “Jack in the Pulpit No.4”.
Locally, Buhari’s (1989) “floral notes” exhibition puts forward some paintings with
visible floral forms as seen in Fig. 24 “Spirit of Van Gogh”, while in other works like
“Nostalgic landscape” and “Through the wilderness of men” shared similarities to works
of Redon (1840- 1916), in having human and floral forms visible. While “A garden at
dawn” and “Dialogue between Heaven and Earth” both have abstract floral forms that
could be perceived with fluid rendering of the colours. Garba’s (2011) “Adaptation of the
floral Motifs for Abstract Painting” produced works in progression that transformed the
floral forms to abstract as seen Fig. 25 “the Search” and “Harmony”. So far these artists
have all used lines in their traditional role bordering forms or preparatory stages of
painting as sketches and drawings, on some occasions they exist as mere brush marks,
intensifying contrast or creating movement. Flowers however have colours and vibrancy
which draws the creative mind in adoration of their beauty, the different array of flowers
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in different forms, shapes, textures, sizes and presentation, tempts the artist into
reproducing or drawing inspiration from them.
1.3 Statement of the problem
The flower has provided a comfortable platform for artistic expressions for many
artists and researchers in painting. Many painters have worked on floral paintings looking
at the flower exclusively. Even in situations where bold and solid strokes were employed,
it was perhaps to create movement and intensify contrast in the pictorial planes. There
were also research works done on the floral form but non to the knowledge of the
researcher, were in relation to lines as centre of interest. This gap presents a research
problem for study.
1.4 Aim and Objectives of the Study
The aim of this study is to explore the interactive role of lines as they affect the form
and shape of flowers, while the specific objectives are;
1. To illustrate harmonious coexistence of line on the shapes and form of flowers,
2. to create compositions in which the floral form is fully fused with lines
3. to explore the possibilities of reducing these fully fused forms into simple lines and
geometric forms.
1.5 Significance of the Study
The research will expose to the viewer the many aspects of lines using the flower as a
medium. It will also highlight that lines can render further meaning to the things we see
and when completed, the research will hopefully usher a new direction and understanding
in the dynamics of lines in painting.
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1.6 Justification of the study
This research will expose the possibilities of an interaction of two elements, that is
lines and floral, in which both elements have a certain share of prominence thereby
creating a communication as they affect each other. In doing this, the obvious gap
identified in the previous attempts at exploring the flower through painting will have been
filled hence the justification of the study.
1.7 Scope of the study
This study focuses on Roses, Sunflower, Lilies and Tulip flowers found in the
commercial gardens along Isa Kaita road Kaduna, Kaduna State Nigeria.
1.8 Conceptual Frame Work
Flowers have always been admired by man. This adoration led to their depiction early
back to the mural paintings of the 18th Dynasty. The tomb of Nebamun at Thebes in
Egypt called “Fowling Scene” shows that the lotus flower was well represented. Since
then, many artists have painted flowers for many intentions. According to Amelia (2010)
floral paintings were seen firstly, as early religious symbols in the 13th century AD,
secondly as reportage art in the 16th century AD due to exploration of the new world,
which brought about unknown species of flower to be documented and thirdly as emotive
symbols.
Detailed paintings of flowers had been made by painters such as Monet’s (1840-1926)
“Water lilies evening effect” as seen in Fig. 21, who’s interest is anchored to the effects
of light on his subjects with lines as mere brush stroke. Van Gogh’s (1853-1890)
“Sunflower” Fig. 20 which is characterised by timid lines which appear as patterns
created by the artist’s technique of paint application. Odilon Redon (1840-1916) delves
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more into symbolism and spirituality according to Federico (2001) often mixing the floral
forms with human forms in compositions such as “Ophelia” and “Head with Flowers”,
with lines having only to play their traditional role. Fred (2011) notes that Georgia
O’Keefe’s (1887-1986) paintings feature close-up views of petals and leaves in which the
organic forms become powerful abstract compositions as seen in “Canna Red and
Yellow” Fig. 22. Jerry Buhari’s (1989) “floral Note” paintings were influenced by Odilon
Redon’s style, some of the works had abstracts of human forms such as “Travellers III”
and “Through the Wilderness of Men”, with lines serving simply as boarders and brush
strokes. Garba Benjamin’s (2011) works were more inclined to the transformation of
floral forms to abstract as seen in “The Search” Fig 25. In all the above mentioned works
the artists have used line in its traditional function in their works without giving it any
special attention. The approach of this study is to systematically introduce lines into floral
painting, by creating collaboration between the line and the floral form, where the line is
made to affect and transform the floral forms. The dialogue of the fused floral forms and
lines will then be simplified to simple lines and planes.
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