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Download this complete Project material titled; Appraisal Of The Effectiveness Of Museums And Galleries In The Promotion Of Art Education In South-South Nigeria, 2003-2013 with abstract, chapters 1-5, references, and questionnaire. Preview Abstract or chapter one below

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ABSTRACT

The role of Museums and Galleries cannot be over emphasized as a means of survival to the Nigerian art education. Despite their importance, they still suffer neglect and rejection in the hands of the Nigerians. Museums and Galleries has not been given it proper placement as a promotional tool to our art education. This study is a descriptive survey within south-south Nigeria to appraise the effectiveness of these museums and galleries in the promotion of art education in south-south Nigeria from 2003-2013. A questionnaire was used and lecturers in the Department of Fine and Applied Arts of University of Benin, Edo State and Federal College of Education (Tech) Omoku, Rivers State and Museums and Galleries Staff of Benin, Edo State and Rivers State form the respondents. Data used was structured questionnaire in form of “Yes” or “No”, result shows that museums and galleries in south-south Nigeria from 2003-2013 had failed to discharge their duties as expected. . The study further enlists the followings and many others as recommendations: School authorities should make visits to Museum and Galleries by the fine and applied art students a must at least twice in a year, Government should review Nigeria curriculum on fine and applied arts to suit the current situation of contemporary art. Emphasis should be laid on exploitation of Museum and Galleries to improve students’ awareness on art, particularly African contemporary art and its usefulness to the society, all higher institution in Nigeria should also establish Museum/Galleries attach to fine arts.

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Title Page    …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      i

Approval Page     …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      ii

Dedication  …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      iii

Acknowledgement         …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      iv

Table of Contents …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      vi

Abstract      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      ix

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background of the study   …      …      …      …      …      …      …      1

1.2 Statement of Problem        …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      3

1.3 Aim of the Study     …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      4

1.4 Research Questions …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      4

1.5 Objective of the Study       …      …      …      …      …      …      …      4

1.6 Significance of the Study   …      …      …      …      …      …      …      5

1.7 Scope of the Study  …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      5

CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW

2.1 Historical Background of Museums and Galleries Museums      …      …      7

2.2 Poor Perception of Museums and Galleries   …      …      …      …      20

2.3 Museum Research in Education  …      …      …      …      …      …      22

2.4 Museums, Galleries and the Colossal Task of Art Promotion    …      …      24

2.5 Relevance of Museum and Galleries to Art Education      …      …      ….     28

CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 Research Design …  …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      31

3.2 Area of the Study    …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      31

3.3 Population of the Study    …      …      …      …      …      …      …      32

3.4 Instrument for Data Collection   …      …      …      …      …      …      32

3.5 Validity of the Instrument …      …      …      …      …      …      …      32

3.6 Administration and Data Collection     …      …      …      …      …      33

3.6 Method of Data Analysis  …      …      …      …      …      …      …      33

CHAPTER FOUR: PRESENTATION OF RESULTS AND FINDINGS OF DATA ANALYSIS

4.1 Data presentation and Analysis  …      …      …      …      …      …      34

CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY CONCLUSION RECOMMENDATIONS

AND SUGGESTION FOR FUTHER STUDY

5.1 Summary       …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      48

5.2 Conclusion     …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      49

5.3 Recommendations   …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      51

Reference   …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      53

Appendix  …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      …      56

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1     Background of the Study

A popular adage has it that a prophet is often not honored in his own land. Though allegorically stated, it vividly paints the true state of Art in Nigeria at the end of 20th century.

Contemporary Nigerian art enjoys patronage by foreigners and middle class Nigerians whereas ordinary Nigerians view art patronage with disdain. It is no longer a surreptitious fact that most talented and educated artists in Nigeria still find it difficult to eke out a living solely on professional practice.

According to Grillo (1990), Nigerians, especially the stupendously rich elite, who could be ardent patrons of art, are more interested in mundane pastimes like ostentatious spending at parties and acquiring  car each . While the gory phenomenon of relegation, neglect and ignorance of art persist, the artist like a matured chick is irresolutely eager to crack the suffocating shell and seek his proper place in society. Jegede (1983) aptly describes the scenario thus:

The most sophisticated artist cannot survive in isolation and if he seeks an audience then there is perhaps no other time more auspicious than now to evaluate the worth of the audience… The (only) unfortunate thing, however is that chances for meaningful patronage shall remain jeopardized for as long as the degree of public appreciation of artists remains poor. For public appreciation to improve to a satisfactory level there has to be intensified art promotion and re-orientation towards art by appropriate art institutions like museums, galleries and others.

 

Oladipo (1990), asserts that “our very existence as a people is in danger. This is because our past and our cultural heritage are being treated with disregard and total indifference. Yet it must be clearly appreciated that a people without a past cannot hope for a glorious future”. It is against this background that Museums are today known as modern man’s vehicle or method of proudly displaying and preserving the artistic cultural and historical treasures of his past.

Before Western incursion, Africans valued art for the functionality. Kings, chiefs and priests needed the artists like modern motorists need mechanics. Also the society patronized the artist for household appliances and furniture. However, missionaries   and colonial officers came and condemned African art and cultural heritage with cogmen like “primitive”, “tribal” and “pagan”. Then art and by implication the artists lost their prestige as the kings, Obas and Traditional Priests were dishonored and replaced with new religion and new governments or administration

Ekpo Eyo as quoted in Akanbiemu (1995) depicts this milestone as the systematic population and forbidding on the painful hell fire, the worship of other gods. The obvious result of this was that Christian converts either destroyed their art objects or left them to rot away. Likewise also left to rot was the dignity of the African artists. Stripped of its value, art works became the focus of unwarranted destruction, plundering and stealing by foreign missionaries and their native collaborators. To add to this, the colonialists also brought with them the concept of aesthetics and “art for art sake” which is still very much alien to our culture and which contemporary Nigerian art enjoys mostly the patronage of the Europeans and other foreign nationals who fortunately continue, to maintain their posture as serious promoters and patrons of African art. The burning of a library housing thousands of ancient manuscripts in Mali’s desert city of Timbuktu is just the latest act of destruction.

The focus of this research is to appraise the effectiveness of Museums and

Galleries in the Promotion of Art Education in South-south Nigeria, 2003 –

1.2 Statement of the Problem

There are over 1,000 museums and galleries in Nigeria both Government and private owned, many with department of Art and culture employing art education specialists to interact with children, youth and general public when they visit the museums, making their visits meaningful and vital.  Many schools and institutions of higher learning visit museums and galleries once in a year, some do not visit at all (Chu-Nelson, 2005).

The   place of   museums and galleries has not been properly placed and given the prominence it requires in the promotion of art education. These have succeeded in creating distortion and unnecessary gaps in the art program, hence roles of museums and galleries have been underrated in the promotion of art education 

1.3 Aim of the study

The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of museums and galleries in the promotion of art education in South-South Nigeria

1.4 Research Questions

The following research questions were drawn from the objectives of the study:

  1. What is the quality of the content of the museums and galleries in south-south Nigeria
  2. What are the art educational potentials of the museums and galleries?
  3. Are there any roles played by museums and galleries in the promotion of art education in South-South Nigeria?
  4. To what extent has south-south Nigerian museums and galleries played their promotional roles?

1.5     Objectives of the Study

Art education in Nigeria has shown a lot of neglect to museums and galleries. There are numerous excuses offered by the schools for not taking advantage of art museums and galleries as a source of development and enrichment for the art programs or teaching. According to Chu- Nelson (2005), the main reason of school not taking advantage of museums and galleries is lack of conviction that museums visit can really offer anything of lasting value to the students.

The researcher feels that despite all the excuses, something still has to be done to fully harness the benefits of museums and galleries in the development of art education in Nigeria. Therefore, the study hopes to:

  • Identify the quality of the contents of the museums and galleries in South-South Nigeria,
  • Assess the art educational potentials of the museums and galleries
  • Identify the roles played by museums and galleries in the promotion of art education in South-South Nigeria and
  • Evaluate the contributions of museums and galleries in the promotion of art education in South-South Nigeria.

1.6 Significance of the Study

Majority of Nigerians are myopic about the total roles Museums and Galleries plays in the promotion of art education ( Chu- Nelson, 2005).

Due to this fact, this study will do the following:

Educate the Nigeria public on the roles Museums and Galleries play in the promotion of art education.

Bring Museums and Galleries close to lovers of art

Promote art education through Museums and Galleries in Nigeria.

1.7 Scope of the Study

This research work is on the Appraisal of the effectiveness of Museums

and Galleries in the Promotion of Art Education in South-South Nigeria, 2003 –

2013.

The research work covers the quality of the content of museums and galleries in South-South Nigeria, various roles museums and galleries play in the promotion of art education and the extent to which it is played.  It also covers the problems faced by museums and galleries in the promotion of art education in South-South Nigeria.

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